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PolarBear
01-20-2008, 10:09 AM
With the increasing popularity of the French & Indian War among collectors of toy soldiers I am starting a new thread (in the spirit of the Lt.'s excellent Zulu War thread) for members to display their FIW toy soldiers singly, in groups or as dioramas(mini-photos, diodramas, etc.) The continuing output from John Jenkins and Frontline and now Britains and other companies made me think that it would be great fun to have a special place to look at and compare these wonderful examples of toy soldiers and at the same time learn about the history of this important conflict. I invite anyone interested in this topic to participate in what I hope will be an enjoyable and useful thread.
Randy ( from the state of New Hampshire where Robert Rogers grew to manhood)

PolarBear
01-20-2008, 10:27 AM
To "prime the pump" here is an initial post to this thread

1st Foot at Louisbourg:
An officer of the 1st Regt. of Foot is shown with a spontoon symbolic of his rank on the grounds of the Fortress of Louisbourg in Canada. The 1st Regt. of Foot, 2nd Battalion, participated in the capture of Louisbourg from the French in 1758. The 1st or Royal Scots are the oldest Scottish regiment and the oldest regiment in the British army. The 1st was in North America from 1757 to 1763 and were later involved in the capture of Montreal. (The figure shown is Britains #43007 from their glossy FIW series).

wadepat
01-20-2008, 11:48 AM
Hi Randy,

What a grand idea! Since I do not presently collect French and Indian War figures, I cannot add pictures to this thread. However, I hope other collectors will participate with you by posting pictures of their figures so we might enjoy them and posting bits of history from which we can learn more about this conflict.

Keep up the great work!

Warmest personal regards,

Pat :)

PolarBear
01-20-2008, 12:34 PM
Addendum:

All are welcome to this thread, even if you don't collect FIW. I consider the thread a full and open consideration of the FIW in all its apsects, as the Lt. has done with the Zulu War. As far as figures go, all scales and media are welcome from wargame size up through 12" action figures, plastic, metal, etc,manufactured or your own creations. News about new figures, books etc. on this subject are most certainly desirable posts for this thread. Posting pictures is not necessary--just an interest in the subject:)
Randy

PolarBear
01-20-2008, 03:11 PM
Robert Warner, an officer of the Virginia Provincial Regt. of Foot, enjoys a smoke with his clay pipe in front of a fireplace in a tavern located in the colony. His unit under the command of George Washington participated in 1755 in General Edward Braddock's unsuccessful campaign against the French and Indians in the Ohio Valley. Below is the well known portrait of Washington by Charles Wilson Peale in the uniform of the Virginia Regt. (Figure is Britains #43807)

PolarBear
01-20-2008, 06:36 PM
A second (experimental) take of previous subject with background on glossy photo paper rather than matte (to get richer color for backdrop):

Harrytheheid
01-20-2008, 10:50 PM
Hi Randy,

What a grand idea! Since I do not presently collect French and Indian War figures, I cannot add pictures to this thread. However, I hope other collectors will participate with you by posting pictures of their figures so we might enjoy them and posting bits of history from which we can learn more about this conflict.

Keep up the great work!

Warmest personal regards,

Pat :)

Hi Pat,
I agree with you, this is yet another great idea from Randy.
I also don't collect F&IW at the moment but I'm becoming more interested in it. I'll have caught up with the K&C figures that I really want to get by around June and shall be trawling for a new line to collect during the second half of 2008. I did seriously toy (pun intended) with the idea of the new Britains Zulu War figures, but its looking more and more like it'll be F&IW.....especially given the new civilian releases from JJ.

Best Regards
H

PolarBear
01-21-2008, 09:41 AM
Another day. Another tavern. Not just George W. slept here--but also Robert Warner of the Virginia Regt. of Foot whom we met yesterday.

PolarBear
01-21-2008, 04:09 PM
This set is so gorgeous that it speaks for itself. It is Britains FIW Royal Artillery set #43144. My thanks to Konrad (kogu) for inspiring me with his photos of the set that he posted on CTSC. After that I was hooked:D
Randy 1/21/08

aujj65
01-21-2008, 04:44 PM
This set is so gorgeous that it speaks for itself. It is Britains FIW Royal Artillery set #43144. My thanks to Konrad (kogu) for inspiring me with his photos of the set that he posted on CTSC. After that I was hooked:D
Randy 1/21/08

I can see why....this is an excellent set. have you thought about the Gallery?

Regards

Jeff

Louis Badolato
01-21-2008, 04:46 PM
That is the nicest glossy figure set I've ever seen from Britains. Really top notch.

PolarBear
01-21-2008, 06:24 PM
I can see why....this is an excellent set. have you thought about the Gallery?

Regards

Jeff

Jeff

Yes the Gallery does seem likely . I just have to go through my folders to send them on to Pete at TF. I create all the pages for the TF Resources section and I'm trying to get caught up with those so it may be a while but I sincerely appreciate your interest. I have mentioned to Shannon the idea of having some kind of subject access to the Photo Gallery at least by time/war--i.e. AWI, ACW, WWII. etc.

Randy

PolarBear
01-21-2008, 08:56 PM
Britains Royal Artillery Walkaround:

Front
Back
Opposite Side

PolarBear
01-22-2008, 12:38 PM
Seth Greene, a private in the New Jersey Blues stands at his post outside the billet of Captain Josiah Bartlett, an officer of the regiment. (Figure Britains FIW # 43070)
Randy 1/22/08

PolarBear
01-22-2008, 12:42 PM
Getting tired of standing in the same place (the fate of toy soldiers everywhere) Pvt. Greene has moved when his owner was not looking:D)

PolarBear
01-23-2008, 08:00 AM
Now that I'm seriously collecting Britains FIW series I'm thinking of joining their collectors' club. I am wondering if anyone has picked up the FIW figure they are offering with a membership for 2008?It is figure #43013C which depicts a Pvt. of the 1st Foot Guards Battalion Co. 1754-1763. If you have one I would love to see a good photo of it. The online photo is too small to really see details.
Thanks.
Randy

PolarBear
01-23-2008, 10:00 AM
"William Parker, of Londonderry, New Hampshire, a new member of Rogers' Rangers scouts the forest in search of game."
Provincial Rogers' Ranger 1754-1763 Britains FIW Series #43145
Randy 1/23/08

PolarBear
01-23-2008, 04:21 PM
Treefrog is now carrying Allotoy Roman soldiers. They are distributed by Saimex. Shannon has told me they sell a FIW line. I checked the Saimex site and here are some pictures. Does anyone have experience with these figures? I believe they are 65mm tall (at least the Roman series are) The figures are sold in tourist shops in Italy. Randy

British:

PolarBear
01-23-2008, 04:23 PM
The French:

PolarBear
01-24-2008, 08:45 AM
"It's 1755 and 1st Foot Guards Pioneer Alexander Wallace of Inverness, Scotland now in the woods of North America takes a break from clearing trees and brush from the battalion's campsite."
(Figure Britains FIW Series #43101 Pioneer 1st Foot Guards 1755)
Randy 1/24/08

PolarBear
01-24-2008, 08:46 AM
Closeup:

PolarBear
01-25-2008, 06:10 AM
"Halt! Who Goes There?"
William Kelly of the 45th Regiment of Foot, guards the entrance to the storehouse (magazin general) at the Fortress of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island, Canada. The 45th came to North America in 1758 to help New England colonists sieze conrol of the French settlement. The 45th also participated in the Battle on the Plains of Abraham on September 13th, 1759. The regiment returned to Ireland in 1766. (Figure is Britains FIW Series #43142 British Grenadier 45th Regiment of Foot 1754-1763) Randy 1/25/08

PolarBear
01-25-2008, 09:20 AM
"In the Clearing" 1759
Nathaniel Hopkins a member of Gorhams' Independent Company of Rangers emerges from the North American woods into a clearing a few months prior to his units participation in the Battle on the Plains of Abraham. (Figure Britains FIW Series #43088 Independent Co. of Rangers--Gorhams 1759)
Randy 1/25/08

PolarBear
01-25-2008, 10:44 AM
Ken Osen made a very useful comment to me about the role of the #2 man in the new FIW Royal Artillery set. I see that Frontline has done the same with theirs. I pass it on to fellow FIW collectors. Randy
"
Just as a point of historical information,,, the No. 2 position on the 6pdr has the responsibility of tending the vent. One of the important duties here is to prevent the rush of air into the breech, through the vent by placing your finger tightly over the vent while the No. 2 man sponges the bore, or seats the cartridge and round. I love your positioning in the photo, but you might also consider placing No.2 man's hand over the vent."

aujj65
01-25-2008, 11:40 AM
Randy. Just how many of the Britains Classic range do you have now? You seem to have most of the FIW figures.

Jeff

PolarBear
01-25-2008, 12:13 PM
Randy. Just how many of the Britains Classic range do you have now? You seem to have most of the FIW figures.

Jeff

Hi Jeff

I do have all the FIW so far and have the others on orde, I also have 43086 (diorama forthcoming) and 43049 which I posted as a dio awhile back. I also have some other Bluecoats & Redcoats on order. I love this Classic series ( and this is coming from a matte finish guy) because the attention to detail, sculpting and painting are outstanding. Ken and WB have outdone themselves with this series. I am also looking forward to the new matte Regiments series which will include an FIW Grenadier in the first batch and a Highlander from an Independent Co. circa 1745.

Randy

Mister Dave
01-25-2008, 12:25 PM
Now that I'm seriously collecting Britains FIW series I'm thinking of joining their collectors' club. I am wondering if anyone has picked up the FIW figure they are offering with a membership for 2008?It is figure #43013C which depicts a Pvt. of the 1st Foot Guards Battalion Co. 1754-1763. If you have one I would love to see a good photo of it. The online photo is too small to really see details.
Thanks.
Randy

Randy, we have not received our club figures for '08 yet. Should be soon I think.

PolarBear
01-25-2008, 01:43 PM
Randy, we have not received our club figures for '08 yet. Should be soon I think.

Dave

Andy Pugio was told by the people at 1st Gear that the figures would ship in April--Just before the govt. sends those checks to boost the economy and provide for our toy soldier budgets.:D Shannon should plan a big sale for the Spring!:)

Randy

Mister Dave
01-25-2008, 03:08 PM
Dave

Andy Pugio was told by the people at 1st Gear that the figures would ship in April--Just before the govt. sends those checks to boost the economy and provide for our toy soldier budgets.:D Shannon should plan a big sale for the Spring!:)

Randy

Oh, you know part of that rebate check is going toward the Rorke's Drift Hospital for sure...Yeee-haaaaawww!

Ken & Ericka Osen/H&A Studio
01-26-2008, 12:15 PM
Hello There!
Again it might be jumping the gun, but I thought you might like to see another new Petticoats figure designed to complement Redcoats & Bluecoats in the French & Indian War period. You have been doing such a wonderful job creating storylines with your photo dioramas I will leave it up to you to title this one.
All the Best,
Ken Osen

Hudson & Allen Studio / W. Britain

http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc166/handa56/1760CouplePetticoats70.jpg

PolarBear
01-26-2008, 01:29 PM
Ken
What a gem. This is going to be quite a year. The big question is will these couples eventually have offspring who play with toy soldiers:)?
Thank you for this wonderful preview.

Here is my storyline:

"The Flower of Youth" 1757
Captain Richard Mackenzie of the 1st Regt. of Foot strolls with his fiancee Arabella Stewart in the gardens near the parade grounds where the regiment has gathered prior to leaving for North America.

PolarBear
01-26-2008, 02:15 PM
"Ready for Anything" 1758
Thomas Danforth of Rogers' Rangers pauses in the New England woods with musket and hatchet at the ready for any foe coming his way.
(Figure John Jenkins Set # SRR-02 Rogers Rangers set 2)
Randy 1/26/08

PolarBear
01-27-2008, 10:42 AM
"A Word of Caution" 1758
Two members of Rogers' Rangers separated from their party during the Battle on Snowshoes proceed with caution through the woods near Lake George, in hopes of being reunited with the rest of their unit."
(Figures John Jenkins: from SRR-01 and SRR-02 Rogers Rangers)
Randy 1/27/08

PolarBear
01-29-2008, 06:04 AM
FIW re-enactors at Fort Niagara--showing British, Highland and French Uniforms.
I ran across this photo on the web and thought it gave a nice cross-section of attire of the period we are collecting and studying.
Randy

plasmapulse
01-29-2008, 07:00 AM
Randy, I came across this thread just now and am blown away. You have some photographic/scenic skills. I bow to you.

PolarBear
01-29-2008, 07:41 AM
Randy, I came across this thread just now and am blown away. You have some photographic/scenic skills. I bow to you.

Thank you Joachim.
I owe it all to the inspiration of the Lt and his mini-photo dios of the Zulu War.:)

Randy

plasmapulse
01-29-2008, 08:07 AM
Ah yes, the Lt. got me going again on the Zulu war when I joined in march last year. He is totally committed to the subject, something I admire.

PolarBear
01-30-2008, 10:32 AM
"Survival of the Fittest" 1758
Tristram Coffin of Rogers Rangers has a face to face encounter with a bull moose in the woods of New York.
Randy 1/30/08

PolarBear
01-30-2008, 01:13 PM
"She Who Hesitates is Lost" 1758
Jacques Laferriere, a member of the French Company of Marines, fires off a shot at a doe momentarily frozen in her tracks in the woods of New York."
Randy 1/30/08

panda1gen
01-30-2008, 02:19 PM
FIW re-enactors at Fort Niagara--showing British, Highland and French Uniforms.
I ran across this photo on the web and thought it gave a nice cross-section of attire of the period we are collecting and studying.
Randy

prefer Trophy figures myself..............:rolleyes:;):p:):eek:

PolarBear
01-31-2008, 02:01 PM
"A Royal American on the Plains of Abraham" 1759
Hans Guberman, a Private in the Provincial 60th Royal American Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry) keeps watch over the Plains of Abraham where several weeks before the armies of Wolfe and Montcalm clashed during the Siege of Quebec. Guberman was one of a number of immigrants recruited
for the Regiment from German colonists living in North America. (Note the background is a photograph of the actual Plains of Abraham which today is preserved as a Canadian park) Figure is Britains#43120 from the Classics French & Indian War series. Also included below is a scale model of how the Plains appeared at the time of the battle.
Randy 1/31/08

PolarBear
02-03-2008, 12:59 PM
"For King & Country" 1758
Alastair McLeod, of the 42nd Highland Division, meditates by the grave of a fallen comrade in arms. (This diorama was inspired by Robert Griffing's painting "One of their Own.")
Randy 1/02/08

Harrytheheid
02-03-2008, 06:46 PM
"For King & Country" 1758
Alastair McLeod, of the 42nd Highland Division, meditates by the grave of a fallen comrade in arms. (This diorama was inspired by Robert Griffing's painting "One of their Own.")
Randy 1/02/08

What a brilliant photo Randy. Looking forward to more and more.
Cheers
H

PolarBear
02-03-2008, 07:38 PM
What a brilliant photo Randy. Looking forward to more and more.
Cheers
H

Thanks Harry. That Frontline figure just seemed to call out for that theme.
Randy

PolarBear
02-03-2008, 07:39 PM
Closeup #1

PolarBear
02-03-2008, 07:40 PM
closeup #2

PolarBear
02-04-2008, 10:15 AM
"Adieu mon capitaine" 1755
Capt. Jean Dumas and 2 members of the Company of French Marines bid farewell to Capt. Daniel Beaujeu killed by the British at the Battle of Monongahela.
Randy 2/4/08

Below is information on Beaujeu (1711-1755) from the Ft. Necessity website:

"Born in New France, Beaujeu (BOH-joh) was the commander of two important French forts, Fort Niagara and Fort Detroit. He would not have been given those positions if he did not have experience dealing with American Indians. Beaujeu understood the importance of American Indian allies. In 1755 Beaujeu was given his third fort to command, Fort Duquesne.

July 8th, the night before the battle with General Braddock, the French decided that they would ambush the British as they crossed the Monongahela River. However, there were not enough French soldiers. They would need the help of the American Indians. The American Indians had been spying on Braddock’s army. The rumors among the American Indians were that Braddock’s force could not be defeated. Beaujeu worked hard to convince American Indians to ally with the French. The American Indians thought the French were "making no sense." They did not agree to go.

According to legend the next morning Beaujeu and his troops marched out. Beaujeu tried again to convince the American Indians to join him. He said, "I am determined to confront the enemy. What – would you let your father go alone? I am certain to defeat them!" His speech was almost definitely longer than this, but it worked. The American Indians decided to join the French. The barrels of gunpowder and musket balls were brought out and everyone took what they needed. Beaujeu wore no shirt, just like the warriors with him. He wore a crescent shaped piece of metal around his neck called a gorget (GOR-jay). It showed he was a French officer. When they left Fort Duquesne Captain Beaujeu had 637 warriors and 254 French and Canadian soldiers.

They had marched about 6 miles when they were surprised. The British had crossed the Monongahela River. They could not ambush them. As Beaujeu stopped to reorganize the British opened fire. Beaujeu was killed. Now there was great confusion among the French soldiers and warriors. Quickly the Captain Jean-Daniel Dumas took charge.

Although Beaujeu died he had made a difference. The addition of the American Indian warriors to the French force was an important factor in the French winning the battle."

lenswerks
02-04-2008, 06:35 PM
FIW WYI

Tonight 8PM EST on the History Channel International ---

"Just 30 years after the closing days of the American Revolution, an immature United States faced annihilation by its parent! Join us for an epic 2-hour look at the War of 1812, when the mighty British Empire once again waged war against the fledgling US. This largely forgotten war witnessed Washington in flames, inspired the national anthem, allowed the Founding Fathers to step aside for a new generation of common men and women with uncommon courage, and saw America emerge as a world power."

PolarBear
02-04-2008, 07:54 PM
FIW WYI

Tonight 8PM EST on the History Channel International ---

"Just 30 years after the closing days of the American Revolution, an immature United States faced annihilation by its parent! Join us for an epic 2-hour look at the War of 1812, when the mighty British Empire once again waged war against the fledgling US. This largely forgotten war witnessed Washington in flames, inspired the national anthem, allowed the Founding Fathers to step aside for a new generation of common men and women with uncommon courage, and saw America emerge as a world power."

Thanks Lenswork. This will be a nice background for those who wil be collecting John Jenkins new 1812 series.
Randy

lenswerks
02-04-2008, 08:02 PM
Your're welcome.
Sorry for posting in your FIW thread - Senior moment I guess.

PolarBear
02-04-2008, 08:22 PM
Your're welcome.
Sorry for posting in your FIW thread - Senior moment I guess.

No problem. As I said we Jenkins collectors are interested in both his FIW and the new 1812 line. Unfortunately I do not get the HC International. Just the HC.

Randy

PolarBear
02-06-2008, 08:43 AM
"Displaying the Union Jack: The 1st Royal Regiment of Foote at Louisbourg 1758"
(Figures: Britains Redcoats and FIW series # 43101, 43099, 43007, 43102, 43004) Waiting for release of 43143, 43018 due soon:)
Randy 2/6/08
Here is historical information about the Regiment's capture of Louisbourg in 1758: From http://www.1stroyals.org/index.html

1st Royal Regiment,
2nd Battalion
During the Seven Years War, 1756-1763

1758:
In May, the troops, now under the command of Major-General Jeffery Amherst, again sailed for Cape Breton. On 8 June, after six days of being confined onboard due to bad weather and French shore defenses, the British launched a general landing assault at Comorandiere (now known as Kennington Cove) in three divisions. The battalion companies of the regiment, under the command of Lt. Col. Forster formed part of the right (or White) division under command of Brigadier-General Edward Whitmore. Also included as part of this command were the 17th, 47th, 48th, 58th, and 2/60th regiments. This division was to proceed to White Point to make a diversion. The left (or Red) division was under the command of Brigadier-General Wolfe and consisted of all the Grenadiers (including the 1st Royals, the Light Infantry, the 78th Highlanders and one company of rangers. The Blue division was lead by Brigadier-General Lawrence and was made up of the 15th, 22nd, 35th, 40th, 45th, 3/60th regiments.

Leading the Red division to land at Anse-aux-Sables, Wolfe was in one of the lead boats and faced terrific French artillery and musket fire from the shore. He directed the boats to look for a less-defended place to land. Boats with British Light Infantry, under the command of Major Scott, managed to find a less exposed rocky beach and landed. Wolfe immediately rushed as many boats as possible to the spot and landed himself with the grenadiers and Highlanders. The beach was secured and the defending French were driven off with the bayonet. White and Blue Divisions rushed to land and a successful landing was attained with the total loss of killed, drowned and wounded only slightly exceeding one hundred. The British built a fortified camp and brought ashore siege guns and supplies, then quickly surrounded the town of Louisburg and began the siege. The work of digging the trenches and the approaches exposed the troops to great dangers and hardships; however, the town was forced to surrender on 25 July. On 27 July, the grenadier companies of the 1st Royals, Amhersts 15th, and Hopsons 40th formally took possession of the town. Thus Cape Breton and Prince Edwards Island became British dominions.

PolarBear
02-09-2008, 03:15 PM
"Jeremiah Dunlap of the British 15th Regt. of Foot on sentry duty in Nova Scotia in 1758" (Figure Britains #43146 Classics French & Indian War Series 2007)
Note: 1758 was the year the 15th Foot participated in the capture of Louisbourg.
Randy 2/9/08

Ken & Ericka Osen/H&A Studio
02-09-2008, 05:02 PM
"Displaying the Union Jack: The 1st Royal Regiment of Foote at Louisbourg 1758"
(Figures: Britains Redcoats and FIW series # 43101, 43099, 43007, 43102, 43004) Waiting for release of 43143, 43018 due soon:)
Randy 2/6/08
Here is historical information about the Regiment's capture of Louisbourg in 1758: From http://www.1stroyals.org/index.html

1st Royal Regiment,
2nd Battalion
During the Seven Years War, 1756-1763

1758:
In May, the troops, now under the command of Major-General Jeffery Amherst, again sailed for Cape Breton. On 8 June, after six days of being confined onboard due to bad weather and French shore defenses, the British launched a general landing assault at Comorandiere (now known as Kennington Cove) in three divisions. The battalion companies of the regiment, under the command of Lt. Col. Forster formed part of the right (or White) division under command of Brigadier-General Edward Whitmore. Also included as part of this command were the 17th, 47th, 48th, 58th, and 2/60th regiments. This division was to proceed to White Point to make a diversion. The left (or Red) division was under the command of Brigadier-General Wolfe and consisted of all the Grenadiers (including the 1st Royals, the Light Infantry, the 78th Highlanders and one company of rangers. The Blue division was lead by Brigadier-General Lawrence and was made up of the 15th, 22nd, 35th, 40th, 45th, 3/60th regiments.

Leading the Red division to land at Anse-aux-Sables, Wolfe was in one of the lead boats and faced terrific French artillery and musket fire from the shore. He directed the boats to look for a less-defended place to land. Boats with British Light Infantry, under the command of Major Scott, managed to find a less exposed rocky beach and landed. Wolfe immediately rushed as many boats as possible to the spot and landed himself with the grenadiers and Highlanders. The beach was secured and the defending French were driven off with the bayonet. White and Blue Divisions rushed to land and a successful landing was attained with the total loss of killed, drowned and wounded only slightly exceeding one hundred. The British built a fortified camp and brought ashore siege guns and supplies, then quickly surrounded the town of Louisburg and began the siege. The work of digging the trenches and the approaches exposed the troops to great dangers and hardships; however, the town was forced to surrender on 25 July. On 27 July, the grenadier companies of the 1st Royals, Amhersts 15th, and Hopsons 40th formally took possession of the town. Thus Cape Breton and Prince Edwards Island became British dominions.

Hi There! On the New W.Britain catalog thread you might note the three new figures designed to go with this grouping. The mounted officer, the Kings Colour, and the Drum Major. This will now enable collertors to build a Grenadier Company, A Colour Party and massed Fifes and Drums. It is really too bad that the Center Company figure was a limited Collector's Club figure!
Ken

jomartvr
02-09-2008, 07:20 PM
Hi,
Attached is a photograph of a shelf diorama of the 44th Grenadiers (JJD) departing Cork, Ireland for the war in North America.

Benjamin

PolarBear
02-09-2008, 08:02 PM
Hi,
Attached is a photograph of a shelf diorama of the 44th Grenadiers (JJD) departing Cork, Ireland for the war in North America.

Benjamin

Very nice Benjamin. I love the story line and backdrop of the town. What is the source of the walls?
Randy

PolarBear
02-09-2008, 08:06 PM
Hi There! On the New W.Britain catalog thread you might note the three new figures designed to go with this grouping. The mounted officer, the Kings Colour, and the Drum Major. This will now enable collertors to build a Grenadier Company, A Colour Party and massed Fifes and Drums. It is really too bad that the Center Company figure was a limited Collector's Club figure!
Ken

Hi Ken

Any chance that figure might be relased again in some other iteration? It's tough for collectors like myself who just started collecting Classics last year and now want a complete set. I am happy to hear that none of the current Classics will be retired--just go out of stock but then eventully be issued again according to Richard in the TF Rivet. That is a real boone for beginning collectors who want to build up this series.

Randy

jomartvr
02-09-2008, 09:40 PM
Hi Randy,
Thanks for the kind words. The wall is a KC Roman City gate.

Have you see JJD's blockhouse in the flesh?

Cheers,
Benjamin

Ken & Ericka Osen/H&A Studio
02-09-2008, 09:44 PM
I considered that when I sculpted it. The Collector's Club version is 'At the Position of the Soldier', or 'Shoulder Arms'. That would allow us to revisit the Center Company OR as, 'Support Arms', 'Maximum Support', 'Advance Arms' or even 'Order Arms'.
I think that even if the Grenadier Company was on Parade with the Center Company, they could be in a different position.
If the were drilling by Battalion the obvious reason would be the delay between the Prepartory Command and the Command of Execution. Although the difference between the current Center Company OR at Shoulder Arms and the Grenadier at Support Arms is compatible...a new Center Company OR at Maximum Support would also be a perfect companion figure.
As a note here, in this period when the bayonet is fixed the term used is 'Arm', when it is not the term 'Firelock' is used in the command.
So...the short answer would be yes we could.
Ken

PolarBear
02-09-2008, 10:24 PM
Hi Randy,
Thanks for the kind words. The wall is a KC Roman City gate.

Have you see JJD's blockhouse in the flesh?

Cheers,
Benjamin

No I haven't seen it in person but Konrad (kogu) has one that he loves and posted his own photos of.

Randy

PolarBear
02-09-2008, 10:25 PM
I considered that when I sculpted it. The Collector's Club version is 'At the Position of the Soldier', or 'Shoulder Arms'. That would allow us to revisit the Center Company OR as, 'Support Arms', 'Maximum Support', 'Advance Arms' or even 'Order Arms'.
I think that even if the Grenadier Company was on Parade with the Center Company, they could be in a different position.
If the were drilling by Battalion the obvious reason would be the delay between the Prepartory Command and the Command of Execution. Although the difference between the current Center Company OR at Shoulder Arms and the Grenadier at Support Arms is compatible...a new Center Company OR at Maximum Support would also be a perfect companion figure.
As a note here, in this period when the bayonet is fixed the term used is 'Arm', when it is not the term 'Firelock' is used in the command.
So...the short answer would be yes we could.
Ken

Thank you Ken for your learned discourse. That's encouraging that WB might revisit it in the future.

Randy

PolarBear
02-15-2008, 10:56 AM
"Les ramasseurs de souvenir 1758"
Members of a woodland Indian raiding party allied with the French gather souvenirs and booty from a small British outpost in the wilderness of New York during the height of the French & Indian War.
{Figures: K&C AWI)
(Photo backdrop of John Jenkins FIW Blockhouse courtesy of Konrad aka kogu on the forum)
Randy 2/15/08

PolarBear
02-15-2008, 01:10 PM
"A Provincial Gathering 1760"

During the French & Indian War colonial provincial regiments have gathered at a northeasten outpost to prepeare for new battles with the French and their Indian allies for the possesion of the North American Continent.
(Figures: Britains Classics FIW #43070 Pvt. New Jersey Regt. and #43087 Officer Virginia Regiment) (John Jenkins Blockhouse photo courtesy of Konrad/kogu)
Randy 2/15/08

kogu
02-15-2008, 01:48 PM
[QUOTE=jomartvr;95078]Hi,
Attached is a photograph of a shelf diorama of the 44th Grenadiers (JJD) departing Cork, Ireland for the war in North America.

Benjamin


Hi Benjamin,

that's a nice picture, Benjamin, and you make good use of the K & C gate here. I also have some of the JJ marching figures that I will be using in a future diorama.
Thanks for posting this.

Konrad

PolarBear
03-03-2008, 02:53 PM
"les chutes du Québec 1757"

Louis Chartrand of the Company of French Marines and Abooksigun (Wildcat) an Indian scout allied with the French stand above the Falls of Québec during the 3rd year of their conflict with the British for the control of North America.
Randy 3/03/08

debrito
03-03-2008, 03:04 PM
That one is la meilleure photo, the best of ....your Indian war..

Alexdakar
03-03-2008, 03:12 PM
"les chutes du Québec 1757" pic looks very cool.

PolarBear
03-03-2008, 03:22 PM
Thanks guys.
Joe Baker's (playsetaddict) FIW falls pictures were my inspiration. Here is one he did that blew me away:

PolarBear
03-04-2008, 01:45 PM
"The Sublime & the Beautiful 1758"

Deep in the wilderness of New York, two of Robert Rogers' Rangers make their way past the sublime beauty of a frozen waterfall. The forces of nature captured in all their awe and power and the perfect backdrop for the "clash of empires" that was the French & Indian War.
Randy 3/4/08

Captain
03-04-2008, 06:58 PM
I'm shiverin' from just lookin' at that frozen waterfall. Great shot.

Shannon Reuss
03-04-2008, 07:19 PM
Randy,
Your vignettes are awesome. Excellent work on integrating your figures and accessories seamlessly with your photo backdrops.
Beautiful!

Harrytheheid
03-04-2008, 09:29 PM
Thanks guys.
Joe Baker's (playsetaddict) FIW falls pictures were my inspiration. Here is one he did that blew me away:

Randy,
That is one beeeeaaaa-utiful photo.

PolarBear
03-04-2008, 09:46 PM
Randy,
Your vignettes are awesome. Excellent work on integrating your figures and accessories seamlessly with your photo backdrops.
Beautiful!

Thanks Shannon

There is a lot of talent on the forum and its fun to see everyone's contributions. Having this outlet for creativity is a great positive stength of the forum. The digital age has made a big difference to us all.

Randy

PolarBear
03-04-2008, 09:47 PM
Randy,
That is one beeeeaaaa-utiful photo.

Harry

Nice to see you back in circulation.

Be good, well and happy.


Randy

PolarBear
03-16-2008, 04:27 PM
"Wolfe's Lair 1759"
Brigadier General James Wolfe confers with a Highland scout deep in the woods along the St. Lawrence River in the summer before his fateful Siege of Quebec. A second Highlander keeps a wary lookout for French or Indian skirmishers.
Randy 3/16/08

PolarBear
03-17-2008, 01:29 PM
"Clearing the Way"

Members of the 1st Regt. of Foot including axe-wielding pioneers have cleared the way for the Royal Artillery to set up their 6 pdrs. at the edge of a North American forest during the French & Indian War.
Randy 3/17/08

thebritfarmer
03-17-2008, 01:37 PM
Randy

Your pictures never cease to amaze me. You really manage to capture the essence of what you are photographing. I like that the photographs are simple and each figure can be appreciated with out it being just a cluttered mess.

Thanks again


Awaiting the next round :)

Scott

PolarBear
03-17-2008, 02:20 PM
Randy

Your pictures never cease to amaze me. You really manage to capture the essence of what you are photographing. I like that the photographs are simple and each figure can be appreciated with out it being just a cluttered mess.

Thanks again


Awaiting the next round :)

Scott


Thanks Scott

My style has been influenced by the 19th C American painter of the Civil War, Winslow Homer as illustrated below in his painting THE BRIERWOOD PIPE:

kogu
03-17-2008, 03:08 PM
Randy,
your last two posted photos are very nice again.
Two great scenes.
Thanks for bringing those up.
Konrad

PolarBear
03-17-2008, 03:14 PM
Randy,
your last two posted photos are very nice again.
Two great scenes.
Thanks for bringing those up.
Konrad


Thanks Konrad

Your avatar looks great.

Randy

Captain
03-17-2008, 03:55 PM
Well Done Mr. PolarBear. I especially like the fact that there is field artillery in the shot. Your beautiful photography is matched only by the subject matter sir.

PolarBear
03-17-2008, 04:21 PM
Well Done Mr. PolarBear. I especially like the fact that there is field artillery in the shot. Your beautiful photography is matched only by the subject matter sir.

Thanks Captain. That is my first artillery piece in my collection and I love it.

Randy

PolarBear
03-17-2008, 08:48 PM
John Jenkins Trading Card #1

PolarBear
03-28-2008, 12:57 PM
"Some folks just have to learn the hard way" 1758

Dickbuttons
03-28-2008, 05:30 PM
Thanks for the latest two photos in a superb series.

PolarBear
04-25-2008, 01:18 PM
Avant le Québec

As one of Wolfe's Rangers informs the general that a patrol of Canadian militia has been spotted on its way towards the Ranger's camp, other members of the unit take up defensive positions. It is 1759 and Rogers and his men are preparing for the invasion of Quebec. The Rangers are wearing their newly issued black and blue uniforms mixed with woodland Indian accouterments.
[Figures by John Jenkins]
Randy 4/25/08